2013

Use this page to find our 2013 postcard creations. As always, if you have any questions about our creative inspirations or our group, post a comment.

We hope you find some inspiration from our postcard collection – happy stitching!

January-February

Our January-February postcards to kick off the new year were inspired by this photo of the moonlight:

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This photos came from Wanda and she had this to say about it:

My hubby was standing in our living room and told me to look out the transome window. This is what was on the other side. I tried to capture the beauty with my little camera. It’s a bit blurry due to the zoom and no tripod but this was the best of the bunch I took! Hope it inspires you!

Andrea

Here is Andrea’s interpretation of this theme:

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In Andrea’s words:

I felt like making something whimsical for this inspiration photo and thought about the man in the moon. The moon and background were wet felted. I cut the moon out of pre-felt and laid it on the roving before felting. I was really pleased with how this kept the shape of the moon from distorting during the felting process. I then embroidered the moon face and couched some wisps for the clouds. I couldn’t help but smile while I was working on this so am now sending a smile your way!

Andrea also created a second whimsical card:

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In Andrea’s words:

I couldn’t resist making an extra card from Wanda’s inspiration photo of the moon. Wanda and I both love Halloween and have a similar sense of humour. My mind started wandering…Halloween moon…full moon…”mooning” someone…and this was what resulted. Wanda sent such a lovely inspiration photo, and what did I do? I sent her this postcard and “mooned” her! She phoned me laughing when she got it…I knew she would like it!

The background was a commercial fabric. I found a cartoon of a mooning witch online that I used for inspiration. I drew onto the fabrics and fused the shapes to the background. I couched some embellishments including the glitzy mesh ribbon in the hat. I had a lot of fun with this and hope you enjoy it!

Eleanor

Eleanor created this postcard:

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In Eleanor’s words:

I wanted to create a definite halo effect with the moon when I saw this picture. I used six layers of different sheers, from light to darker on top, to create the sky area. The moon was cut from a silver metallic fabric stabilized with iron on fusible pellon. It was glued to the first layer of sheer which was backed with an opaque white polyester fabric. Successive larger circles were cut in each sheer layer to produce the light to darker halo around the moon. The trees were embroidered using silk and cotton embroidery threads and Medici wool. The stitches used were the fly and feather stitches.

All the sheers were synthetic fibres so I was able to cut the circles with soldering iron to seal the edges so they wouldn’t fray. I should have had the trees covering the moon and halo more than they do so that the ‘halo’ edges would have been more stable. I did put a tiny bit of glue on the edges here and there to help keep them flat.

Carol S.

Here is Carol S.’s interpretation of the January-February theme:

Moon over Wandas house

In Carol’s words:

When I first saw Wanda’s picture I thought of a technique that I had seen in an issue of Stitch magazine that I always wanted to try. After a bit of a search through ‘the room at the end of the hall’ I found the magazine, with the piece called “Sunset Through the Trees”.

The trees are formed by withdrawing the horizontal threads and wrapping the vertical threads. The bottom of the tree have more vertical threads wrapped together to make the trunk, and then smaller amounts are taken from it to make the upper branches. The tops of the trees are buttonhole stitch and colonial and French knots. The grass around the trees are eyelet stitches, buttonhole loops, woven picots, colonial and French knots, pulled thread, and some other stitch that looked nice in the picture in the magazine, but I couldn’t quite figure it out.

Before stitching the actual postcard, I stitched a smaller version on an Artist Trading Card on 18 count mono canvas, so knew that I couldn’t make my moon round without a base, so I made my moon by covering a quarter with a piece of white felt and a shiny, transparent material. In retrospect, I probably should have used a nickel, because my moon is pretty large.
To make the clouds, I used wisps of roving from the ends of silk paper. The moon and clouds were stitched to a black foundation fabric, and the trees were placed on top.

The trees lost a bit of effectiveness as compared to the magazine because my open area was larger to fit the postcard. If doing it again, I would make it a smaller size (like the ATC, only on linen instead of 18 count mono canvas). I’d like to try doing one solitary tree.

The trees were stitched on 28 count Midnight Blue linen using DMC Embroidery Cotton and Caron Collection Watercolours thread (the colour of the thread is Dark Shadows).

Deb

Deb created this postcard:

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In Deb’s words:

The moon is silver fabric but the sky is made of strips of Lindt chocolate wrappers stitched in place. The branches are machined.

I loved the imagery and after only one false start was inspired.

Kim

Kim was inspired to create this postcard:

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In Kim’s words:

I started with a felt background and needle felted the sky. I then needle felted a white circle for the moon. I wanted dimension so I couched pipe cleaners in place and then attached small felt leaves to the pipe cleaners. I added some smaller sticks and other detail with cotton floss.

This was a lot of fun, can’t wait for the next photo.

Anna

Anna took inspiration and created this postcard:

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In Anna’s words:

I tried for the halo around the moon, and the shadows of the trees. So the moon was cross-stitched over waste canvas, two layers of tulle were tacked down with half stitches, and the tree branches are button thread twisted into cord and couched.

Carol E.

Carol E. created this postcard:

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In Carol’s words:

Like Carol S. I love to see the moon through the bare branches, & especially through drifting clouds. I painted the silk background with silk paints, except the moon for which I used acrylic white. It is a bit stark so if I did this again, I would probably add a bit of colour. I began the clouds with some unspun silk roving which just happened to tone very well with the background, but it was too fly-a-way & I had to use stitches to try & stabilize it a bit, but not too successfully. These trees actually grow along our south boundary, (except there are a long row of them), & the fence pretty well looks like this except the wire reaches to the ground to keep the dogs in, & hopefully the coyotes out! I used crewel wool for the trunks, DMC for everything else, except the wire. For this I used Piper’s silk. My husband suggested the owl & it reminds me of one that sat in these trees for hours last year watching the fields beyond for its dinner. I really enjoyed working on this! Thanks for the inspiration Carol S! I’m glad you like it Laurena.

Mary Wyn

Mary Wyn created this postcard:

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In Mary Wyn’s words:

This is my moon thro the window….which Andrea has just rec’d. I did some needle felting for the back ground and couched the branches and had a pretty button which I bought a long time ago because I liked it and thought someday it would come in handy. It makes a pretty good moon. I liked the picture.

Sue

Sue found inspiration and created this postcard:

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In Sue’s words:

When I started thinking about this photo and what I could do, my mind kept going back to the first exchange when we had a similar photo and what I had done then. I left this until one evening I saw the stars and remembered the good times I used to have with my Dad when we would sit outside and look at the stars. He would point out all the constellations and give me all kinds of information about stars.

This card was stitched to remember these good times spent with him. It is very simple and I apologize for that, but you know when an idea sticks you just need to go with it.

I had a piece of wonderful purple/navy blue pre felt, wish I could tell you I dyed it myself, but no, I bought it from Dale Rollinson at Seminar in Victoria.

I placed the moon in the right upper corner with needle felted gold and blue angelina and some blue wool. I then put in the Big Dipper stars, can you see them? These I made bigger by stitching a star in metallic thread and then placing a big crystal bead with a small bead on top of it. The mid distance stars were just one crystal bead and the far away stars were added with just tiny running stitches in silver thread.

I felt this followed Mary Wyn’s Pansy Patch very nicely as I am sure when we have our retreat there we will see the moon and stars from the turret room.


March-April

With spring beckoning and creeping out here and there, we used this photo as our creative launching pad:

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Here is what Carol E. had to say about this theme for March-April:

I almost changed it as this is not a spring picture but I am really curious to see how everyone interprets this. I love the rich colours.

Still snowed in here! Thankfully the snow has stopped so now it is just waiting for the plow, so any season other than winter looks good now!

Sandra

Sandra created this postcard:

Sandra's Hollyhocks

Here is what Sandra had to say about this postcard:

The background was simple white cotton with stem stitched lines. I then used wrapped stem stitch for the flower stems in a couple of greens. The flowers are detached buttonhole (thanks to Margaret Vant Evre for the technique). The leaves and buds are colonial knots (thanks to Carol S. for yet another tutorial in how to do them), bullions and some more detached buttonhole.

I stitched this one at the fair and loved it.

Mary Wyn

Mary Wyn created this postcard:

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In Mary Wyn’s words:

I’ve been taking the EAC brazilian embroidery course so I used the brazilian threads to make the leaves….it is a nice shiny thread….a little finicky to work with. Can’t say brazilian embroidery is going to be high on my list of favorite things to do but I’m glad I’ve done the course. I did quite a bit of “cheating” on the flowers so it will be interesting to read the critique on my piece.

Sue

Sue created this postcard:

leaves March

In Sue’s words:

I wanted to get the dimension with the hazy leaves,lattice work and then the leaves.

I painted a piece of paper towel for the hazy background. I then cut the lattice from a paper napkin with shades of brown on it which I had backed with fusible webbing.

I made the leaves from organza, firestar fibres and solvy which was then free motion stitched and then cut into leaf shapes.
I layered it all together with some of the leaves poking through the trellis.

This was a great image to play with.

Anna

Anna found inspiration and created this postcard:

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In Anna’s words:

Surprise! Another bit of Brazilian. I have this stash of lovely rayon threads, and this seemed a most appropriate way to use them. The sequins I begged from another embroiderer.

Kim

Kim created this card:

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In Kim’s words:

My goal was dimension and keep it simple.

I used a felt background and added organza leaves and felt leaves. I then stitched simple veins to attach and anchor the leaves. I added a couple blue shaded beads to add to the dimension.

This was fun and I loved the photo!

Carol S.

Carol S. created this postcard:

Blueberries

In Carol’s words:

This was a fun postcard to create, but for some reason I felt like I had half my stash in the living room. I’m blaming it how much space fibre fill takes up.

For the background, I fused a piece of silver cloth to pellon, and fused a wide piece of shimmery blue ribbon to that. In our Guild program this year, we made “tiles” so the lattice is made out of leftover pieces from my tiles. I attached these with a running stitch, as they were too thick to fuse into place.

The leaves were purchased and waiting in my stash; they’re actually maple leaves that I cut to look more like the leaves in the picture.

The blueberries were fun. I cut circles out of a mystery fabric and put running stitches around the edges. As I gathered the edges in, I stuffed them with fibre fill. The edges frayed just a little bit, and I thought that quite added to the overall blueberry, as blueberries appear to be kind of puckered. I attached twisted cords made from some red floss and attached them loosely to the postcard.

I was even lucky enough to find a blueberry stamp to put on the back!

Eleanor

Eleanor created this postcard:

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In Eleanor’s words:

I painted the background cotton fabric with white and Shimmer Pearl Setacolor fabric paints. A piece of heavyweight pellon was attached to the back to help stabilize the fabric. I used brown silk strips for the lattice fence and they were fused to the background fabric. The leaves were cut from hand painted Lutradur, which was left over from another leaf project. The veins were drawn in with pencil crayons. The leaves were tacked down with a small amount of glue.

To make the berries I used #6 pony beads and wrapped them with three different values of DMC embroidery floss, using two strands. A long stem was included at the end of the wrapping and this stem was used to attach the berries to the background. To finish the edge I did a satin stitch by machine. Due to the fusing of the silk strips the edges were not even in weight and thickness and when I did the stitching the thinner areas buckled and rippled. So I am not very happy with the finishing on this card. Lesson learned – make sure the edges are even in thickness when doing a satin stitch!!

Deb

Deb created this postcard:

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In Deb’s words:

It’s called “Blueberries are Ripening” and is done in the style of Sue Dove…slashes of colour using straight stitch with full strands of floss on needlepoint canvas. I love how the blocks of colour pop out with the black outlines. Should have added more leaves and had smaller fence slats, though.

Wanda

Wanda created this postcard:

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In Wanda’s words:

I was inpired by Kirsten Chursinoff on this one. She uses such a cool mix to make her fibre art.

I fused a wild combination of fabrics down and stitched around it with the zigzag on my machine. Love it! Definitely want to do more like this!


May-June

For May-June, we did things a bit differently and participated in the EAC President’s Challenge. We took our inspiration from none other than Colonel Chris Hadfield:

Space…the final frontier! We have a new President’s Challenge that challenges all EAC members to create a piece of stitched art, postcard-size or other, that is inspired by Colonel Chris Hadfield’s photos from his current mission as Commander of Expedition 35, International Space Station. We are all extremely proud of the work he is doing on the ISS. He is a true Canadian hero!

Your entries will be posted here, on our Facebook page, as well as on our website (www.eac.ca). Add any link to whatever inspired you and be sure to check out Col Hadfield’s gallery for all sorts of inspiration. It is truly awe-inspiring!

http://www.facebook.com/AstronautChrisHadfield

http://www.facebook.com/AstronautChrisHadfield/photos_stream

Sue

Here is Sue’s creation:

Sue's Hadfield postcard

In Sue’s words:

I liked this image because I thought it would translate well with needle felting and stitch and beads and be relatively quick!

I used black felted wool as a base and then needle felted some yellow roving in the general shape that I needed. Next I used stem stitch and running stitches in light effects DMC thread to add more definition and then finished off with gold and bronze beads.

Anna

Here is Anna’s creation:

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In Anna’s words:

Somehow, the city-scapes appealed to me, perhaps because of the geometric look to them, that spoke of cross-stitch. So here is Winnipeg from space. (Not my home town, but next door.)


July-August

Ah, summer finally arrived and this brought above all else, time to relax and enjoy the outdoors. It was also a time to catch up with friends and family, relaxing at a cottage and enjoying some good food and a glass or two.

In keeping with the summer vibe, our theme for these long summer days was all about the view from Colleen’s cottage – The Slow Lane. We had two photos to choose from:

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We hope you had a great summer – most of all, that you got lots of stitching done!

Sue

Sue created this postcard:

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In Sue’s words:

I used eucalyptus dyed fabric that I had bought at Seminar in Victoria for the rocks and added a layer of organza to try for some dimension. The water is blue organza placed over the rock fabric. I had hoped the rocks would show under the water but that did not happen. I then used machine stitching and finished off with some hand stitching . Do you see the face in the rock on the right? this was an accident, I think it is Colleen watching me!

Anna

Anna created this postcard:

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In Anna’s words:

I have had a sample of fabric labelled “Tisket Tasket” in my stash for quite some time, and periodically wondered what on earth I could do with this piece of heavy grey material. Well, it looked like stone, so I ravelled the edges and used the threads to give some texture to the rocks, and cleaned some of a variety of green flosses out of my boxes to make the vegetation. Fairly quick and fun to do.

Mary Wyn

Mary Wyn created this postcard:

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In Mary Wyn’s words:

This is the post card I sent to Laurena….the picture from Colleen…..used a bit of everything on it, a piece of ribbon, black work.,etc. When I finished I looked at it and said (to myself)….I should have done this, this, this, etc. but, too late. If nothing else, these post cards are a bit of a “learning” experience. Keep hoping the next one will be better.

Kim

Kim created these postcards:

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In Kim’s words:

I decided to use the first photo for Eleanor’s card. I still wanted to use needle felting. This time I used a variety of yarns I bought at Creativ Festival and felted them. This helped to give a variety of shading to the greenery. I then added a little more dimension by felting a green layer to go over top of these yarns. I had fun with this one too!

For those who missed the one I gave Colleen, I have attached it (brown table in its background).

Carol E.

Carol E. created this postcard:

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In Carol’s words:

Well, I sure had trouble deciding what to do this time. I loved the second picture & didn’t want to change it but didn’t want to replicate it either. My husband thought the rock in the first photo looked like a fish’s head but I didn’t want to stitch a fish. Finally, I thought about what I like best about rocks, & examining them closely would have to be it. So I chose a section from photo #2 to highlight. The darker green appeared to be a moss growing where some silt had collected in the cracks, & the light grey French knots represent lichen which is such an early life form.

I used silk paints to paint the background & sprinkled salt on the moist surface for an interesting effect. I got carried away & used too much but it is still fun to see what happens with it. Pencil crayons were also used a bit. I liked the flow of the cracks & took the liberty of adding an extra one. but was concerned about balance with only two greens; however the lichen in each section seemed to unify the different spaces. (I hope.)

Joyce

Joyce created this postcard:

July August 2013 postcard

In Joyce’s words:

I tried using fused silk paper with acrylic paints to give the large rocks, trees and water a background to embellish. However, I wasn’t happy with the results so started over. This time I used cotton fabrics. The grey fabric has subtle shading to suggest the dips, etc. in the rocks and green fabric has a leaf pattern. I also layered black netting at the bottom to resemble the dark water. The light coloured thread is a multi-textured cotton which I used to highlight the rocks. Both the green and grey stitches are a fine DMC wool. Most of the stitches used are variations of the Sorbello stitch. I came across an article by Jan beany in a ‘Stitches’ magazine where she had used many variations of this stitch in a sampler. This is a fun stitch to play with.

I quite enjoyed doing this postcard.

Eleanor

Eleanor created this postcard for July-August:

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In Eleanor’s words:

I finally got this card done. I seemed to have a difficult time getting motivated and deciding what to do with this picture and then I ended up not being too thrilled with my result. It seems rather flat – as though it needs to be more three dimensional – and therefore it is not too inspiring to look at.

I used pieces of polyester and rayon fabrics fused to fusible Poly Lam and machine appliquéd in place with silver metallic thread. The greenery was embroidered in the upper left and right hand corners using the detached chain stitch, fly stitch and feather stitch. French knots were used for the lichen on the rocks. Pencil crayons, feather and outline stitches were used to create shadowed areas on the rocks. I used blending filament, silk and cotton embroidery floss and metallic threads. Beads were attached to the edge of the water fabric.

The stitchery was backed with heavy weight fusible pellon. A polyester knit fabric was used for the binding of the edges and the strips were secured in place with a machine zig zag stitch using metallic thread.

Deb

Deb created this postcard for July-August:

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In Deb’s words:

As we have similar rocks around our house, I chose to do the growth that’s invariably present on these outcroppings. Again, using mostly colonial and French knot stitches and a variety of threads, ribbons, etc, the texture comes through of what would normally appear to be smooth rock. The ground is wool felt. It’s called “I’m Lichen It”.


September-October

For the first two months of fall, we were inspired by this photo (thanks to Eleanor):

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Here is what Eleanor has to say about this photo:

For an embroidered project I thought that it would be an interesting idea to use patterned fabric for an inspiration. I looked through my commercial fabrics and a variety of drapery samples but I didn’t see anything that really lent itself to embroidery techniques.

Then I checked my stash of hand dyed and painted fabrics. Several years ago I did marbling on a bunch of fabric swatches and this photo is of one of these samples that I actually had saved for stitching on one day – of course that hasn’t happened yet!!!

It will be interesting to see what interpretations come from this fabric design for our September/October postcard.

Joyce

Joyce created this postcard:

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Joyce had this to say about her postcard:

The first thing that came to mind when I saw this photo was a Saskatchewan slew. I started out by laying chenille for the first outline. Next I stitched the green and multi-textured wool at the bottom. Then I stitched green French knots for the algae and blue linen lines on the water.

The photo show some pale yellow which I wanted to add. However, I did not have this with me at the stitching retreat I was attending. So I took a good look at what I did have and decided to add the gold and rust for the field of ready harvest grain.

I added more multi-textured wool for the bushes in the distance. I came across a gopher and couldn’t resist adding him. So what started out as just a slew soon became a farmer’s field. I really had fun stitching this card at our Regina stitchery annual fall retreat mid-September.

Mary Wyn

Mary Wyn created this postcard:

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Here is what Mary Wyn had to say about here creation:

Here is my post card…”marbelling”……I found some funky material (no, I didn’t paint it) in my stash and just added a few lines of wool and some sparkles……it was a challenge.

Sue

Sue created this postcard:

Sept Oct 2013 Sue

In Sue’s words:

As soon as I saw the photo, I knew what I wanted to do. Eleanor and Colleen had both discussed shaving cream dyeing with me, so it seemed fitting to try it for this card. I dyed many pieces of fabric and chose this one to work on, probably not the best fabric, polished cotton, very hard to hand stitch on! The trouble was I liked it the way it was and didn’t want to mess it up with too much stitching. I used a small amount of running stitches following the shapes and left it at that.
I will certainly play with the shaving cream again.

Deb

Deb created this postcard:

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In Deb’s words:

This one is called “Rainbow Revisited”. I used only coral stitch and full strands of floss on wool felt.

Colleen

Colleen created this postcard:

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In Colleen’s words:

The dyed pattern cloth was cut into strips and woven together. To hold it down I used Misty Fuse on top of white tulle (shoud have been the other way around – it should have been under the woven strips). Whipped chain lines with pearl cotton, French knots and a few bugle beads.Background fabric is one of Ingrid Lincoln’s – lovely!

Kim

Kim created this postcard:

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In Kim’s words:

This one was a challenge…each time I looked at it I saw something different….a topographic map, a cross section of a rock, grain of a rock or wood, a river, a snake.

So…I decided to focus on the colours and do what is suggested we do while teaching…redirect the question (and they thought I didn’t listen)

I decided I would play…what do you see???

I followed the lines given and used different metallic threads and recreated the lines close to the photo. The back ground was white felt.

So I ask, What do you see????

Carol E.

Carol E. created this postcard:

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In Carol’s words:

Well, this photo sure was a challenge for me! I finally decided to go with the soft colors that I saw on my computer screen & printout. Sought out a fat quarter in my stash that had similar tones & created a scene, allowing the dyes on the fabric to determine the valley side & horizon. The river, reflecting the evening sky at dusk, was stitched with variegatedSulky thread, but I think DMC well chosen, would have worked better. The foreground growth, overlooking the valley was inspired by my Judith Baker Montano books, & I added an extra tree for an uneven number which I find more pleasing.

In the end I liked the simplicity of the design, assuming that at dusk one sees much less detail, especially if mist is rising from the valley (but you have to imagine that!)

Anna

Anna created this postcard:

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In Anna’s words:

This was a challenge! But I had this packet of embroidery ribbons, and the colors seemed to match. Started simple, got more complicated, with a fair bit of reverse stitching! Trying to duplicate the filmy aspect of the marbling was – interesting. Since Carol has received my effort, here it is for all to see.

Carol S.

Carol created this postcard:

Inversion

Here is what Carol said about her creation:

I percolated for a long time on this postcard, and finally got my idea when searching through my stash of material.
I came across a piece of material that had the same colours as the marbled fabric. It had straight stripes through, so I traced the swirled line of the marbled fabric picture, and did five rows of running stitch with DMC silver metallic thread. I then whip stitched each row of running stitch alternating between purple and teal metallic threads.

Since my background colours are the foreground of the original picture, and my stitching is the colour of the background, I called this piece “Inversion”.

I enjoyed making this postcard and they’re my favourite colours too!

Eleanor

Eleanor created this postcard:

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In Eleanor’s words:

The background is silk shantung painted with blue, violet and light turquoise Setacolor and Lumiere fabric paints. A chain stitch was used to do the design and the threads used were one strand of embroidery floss and metallic threads and a type of flower thread, which a friend brought me from China, but it is finer than DMC flower thread. The cording for the edges was made from the embroidery threads used.

When I joined the postcard group I made a promise to myself to use only fabrics, threads and embellishments that I had in my stash. I kept that promise until this postcard when I went out and bought the darker purple metallic thread. The one I had on hand turned out to be far too dark in colour for the rest of the colours. So I have not only had the fun of creating postcards but I have reduced my stash a bit!


November-December

What could be more fitting than ice, glaciers, and Alaska for the last two months of 2013? Most of us by now are seeing more white stuff than green stuff in our backyards…

This photo of a glacier in Glacier Bay, Alaska by Sue is just the inspiration we need to remember how beautiful and stunning these winter months can be:

Glacier Bay

Colleen D.

Colleen D. created this postcard:

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Here’s what Colleen has to say about her postcard:

The crumpled surface of the galcier was acheived by using Texture Magic on white cotton fabric.

A dilute wash of black fabric dye was brushed on top of the crevases – dust from the surrounding mountains.The boulders and rocks exposed on the bottom of the glacier are made with colonial knots using a Steph Francis spaced dyed thick perle and a Threadworx floss.

A light dusting of snow was made using a pearlized white Luminere paint.

Kim

Kim created this postcard:

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Kim had this to say about her postcard:

For this one I really was atracted to the ice pack. Keeping in mind how the ice will pick up and drop off little bits of this and that, I went to work. I felted a mix for the background. I used wool, some silk thread etc. I then added some beads of different colours and sizes. I also added some pearl cotton and made some chain stitch and coral stitch lines. I then added a couple Syrma Crosses in pearl to give a couple snowflakes.

Carol S.

Carol created this postcard:

Ice

Here is what Carol said about her postcard:

As soon as I saw this postcard I knew what I wanted to do.

Since I don’t have great success with making rocks, I concentrated on the ice. I used a double layer of sheer and shiny white material and machine stitched it with random and squiggly lines to a piece of Texture Magic. I then stitched white and clear beads of different sizes where the stitched lines intersected on the fabric. Not on every intersection though.

I had fun making this postcard.

Mary Wyn

Mary Wyn has created this postcard:

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In Mary Wyn’s words:

I just used blackwork and a little bit of “felting” for the glacier. I must do a bit more felting (I bought a kit) as it seems like fun.

Sue

Sue created this postcard:

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In Sue’s words:

This one was difficult for me , too many ideas but finally went with my favourite, canvas.

I free motion stitched in white,blue and grey on to the canvas and then added hand stitching in silver,blue and white to give some added depth. I then added some tiny beads for snow sparkle and a snowflake sequin. This was fun to make and I must play more with the machine and canvas.

Carol E.

Carol E. created this postcard:

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Here is what Carol has to say about her postcard:

It took me almost 3 weeks to decide what to do with the glacier; I kept thinking abstract but got no where with that until I changed my perspective. I decided to view it from a lower level through the trees which are barely visible in Sue’s photo. I used silk paints on white satin to highlight the lines which I saw that only hint at the glacier behind in the distance, but I wouldn’t blame anyone for thinking it is sky! It doesn’t matter. I have always wanted to try Janice Routley’s idea of using boucle for the trees & thankfully had a couple skeins which I had picked up previously which worked. It was fun to do this card once this approach was chosen. The eagle was added as a last thought to add life & movement.

Joyce

Joyce created this postcard:

Nov Dec postcard

In Joyce’s words:

As soon as I saw this photo I knew exactly what I had on hand to create this card. I used hand dyed and salted purple cotton fabric for the mountains. The cheesecloth for the glacier is coloured with blue, brown and black water colour pencils. Then I attached pearlized beads for sparkle and black and dark copper beads for the sediment in the glacier. I stitched the fly stitch for the trees using from Vikki Clayton green silk thread. Unfortunately the photo is a bit dark so it doesn’t show the colours as well as I would have liked.

Anna

Anna created this postcard:

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In Anna’s words:

I was doing some knitting, and it occured to me that the yarn I was using matched the dirty surface of the glacier in the photo. Found a large weave piece of fabric in my stash and started stitching. Came up with this . Stitching jumbo yarn is a fair cow of a job!

Deb

Deb created this postcard:

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In Deb’s words:

My interpretation was inspired by the lovely blue hue of the snow. The background was a mess of tulle and fabric bits that would normally end up in the garbage…they were just cut into really, really small pieces, fused and then machine stitched. The snowflake was cut from two layers of wool felt…the darker blue ground layer is hard to see but it makes the white upper layer pop. Sparkle was added with clear sequins, which the photograph does not pick up. It looks much better in real life. I really liked this one when I finished and almost didn’t send it! In the end, I made another for myself!

Eleanor

Eleanor created this postcard:

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In Eleanor’s words:

I had no idea what I was going to do for the glacier when I was looking for a fabric in my stash for another project. But I came across this fabric that I used for this postcard. The permanent pressed folds reminded me of the texture of the glacier ice fields I have seen. The folds in the fabric piece are straight across the grain, so to give an illusion of a flowing glacier I placed the fabric so that the folds are at a 30 degree angle. The original fabric is pure white so where the shadows were created by the fabric folds I coloured in some of those areas with blue and mauve pencil crayons.

More texture was added with the addition of iridescent metallic ribbon which was scrunched in place with blue, purple and iridescent beads. Kreinik #16 and #32 iridescent braid was also used and couched with iridescent blending filament. A textured metallic yarn was applied around the edges to finish the postcard.

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